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Atlassian Stacks up for DevOps

13 Jun 2017 1:16pm, by

Atlassian is stacking up its products for its customers. The enterprise software development collaborations tools company now offers all of its primary platforms in a single integrated package known as the Atlassian Stack. The move comes in response to customers finding it difficult to purchase each piece individually, perhaps under different budgets and billing cycles.

This move will help developers and administrators to more easily integrate their Atlassian tools by putting them all on the same purchase order, explained Cameron Deatsch, head of enterprise growth at Atlassian. He said that this move is directly in response to a “major trend” the company has seen around DevOps, in which customers are assembling Atlassian and other tools into unified DevOps tool chains.

“Every product they added from the portfolio became a separate use case, and a separate purchase process,” said Deatsch.

As a single integrated stack, the Atlassian Stack will provide the Jira bug tracking tool, the Confluence content collaboration software, the Bamboo continuous integration server, Jira Service Desk, the BitBucket code repository, and the HipChat messaging platform, all under one banner. All of these products are available for on-prem use, said Deatsch.

The only item not yet on that list is Trello, the project management tools company Atlassian purchased in January.

In the furtherance of supporting the DevOps transformation inside its customers, Atlassian also announced a new DevOps focused store today, and a pair of Playbooks based on Atlassian’s own internal experience with this transition.

Deatsch said that the new DevOps Marketplace is a standalone store featuring a subset of the Atlassian Marketplace tools. He said the Marketplace features “200 add-ons specific to DevOps practices or DevOps processes.” These include supports for things like Jenkins and Amazon Web Services and plug-ins for New Relic and AppDynamics.

“We have learned over our own time that DevOps — much like agile practices seven or eight years ago — the underlying toolset means nothing unless you address the underlying cultural challenges development teams face. Often times, the development team and the operations team aren’t even in the same building. We have gone through this journey ourselves at Atlassian,” said Deatsch.

Deatsch said that Atlassian has cataloged some of its lessons learned on the way to DevOps in the DevOps Team Playbook. This playbook focuses on the cultural changes that need to happen inside a development and operations department in order to enable the move to DevOps.

Atlassian has also made available its DevOps Maturity Model. This interactive Web page tabulates the user’s answer, then shows them just how far along the path to DevOps their organization is.

“It’s pretty simple,” said Deatsch. “We do start with basic things: have you adopted agile? Have you adopted distributed version control systems? How often are you doing builds? Are you doing automated deployment? Who does code review? How documented are processes and practices? Are you deploying?”

“We really take them down that natural step from planning, to deployment, to monitoring,” Deatsch said. “Are you responding within minutes, days, weeks, or months to customer requests? Are you tying your customer feedback into your DevOps process?”


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