DevOps

Software Defined Talk: Open Source Software is Eating the World

22 Dec 2015 5:38pm, by

After discussing strategies for avoiding Christmas gift -giving disasters, the Software Defined Talk crew talk about containers in the enterprise, the conglomerate theory for mature tech companies, open source business models, and Nirvana conspiracy theory movies to avoid. Listen to the SDN podcast, episode #51, here:

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Show Notes

  • If you like video, see this episodes’ video recording.
  • Dell reported numbers: “Dell’s revenue declined by 6 percent year-over-year to $14 billion in its quarter ended in July.” – so, $56 billion run rate. Also: “During Dell’s fiscal 2015, the company’s operating profit totaled $3.2 billion excluding charges. In 2013, that figure was $4 billion.”
  • Yahoo spends $7 Million on Christmas party.
  • The Oncoming Train of Enterprise Container Deployments.
    “Enterprise adoption merely amplifies, by virtue of scale, the effects of anti-patterns in any technology, and containers are no exception.” Also, “Now you’re responsible for all of Linux again even though you’re running one process in it.”
  • Also from Julian, the problems with infinite vacation.
  • Open source, not just software, is eating the world. You make money in open source by selling closed source: “The [open source software] companies that will be pillars of IT in the future are the companies that leverage a successful OSS project for sales, marketing, and engineering prioritization but have a product and business strategy that includes some proprietary enhancements.” Open source makes sales and marketing cheaper to execute because you outsource that to developers. Cf. Godin’s Unhelpful Law of Marketing: great products don’t need marketing.

BONUS LINKS! Not covered in episode

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